Tuesday, 29 May 2018

Sinn Fein's 'shameful acts of glorification'

Sinn Fein MP Mickey Brady
A few weeks ago an SAS flag was erected in the village of Loughgall and Sinn Fein MP Mickey Brady said: 
'I'm appalled to learn that a British SAS flag has once again been reported flying in the village of Loughgall.  This shameful act of glorification will only serve to add further distress to the families of the nine men executed and I am calling for its immediate removal.'

Move forward a matter of days and Mickey Brady was speaking out again.  This time he was chairing a commemoration for IRA member Raymond McCreesh at the notorious Raymond McCreesh children's playground in Newry.

Mickey Brady speaking at a Sinn Fein commemoration
at the Raymond McCreesh playground
The event was to honour Raymond McCreesh and it was in effect a 'shameful act of glorification'.

This is just another example of the hypocrisy of Sinn Fein, whose approach is 'do as I say', not 'do as I do'.

SINN FEIN - OFFENDED BY EVERYTHING - ASHAMED OF NOTHING.

However, the next time there is any discussion about the Sinn Fein sponsored commemorations and glorifications of the IRA or the erection of memorials to IRA terrorists, we can remember the words of Mickey Brady and quote them back to Sinn Fein - 'this shameful act of glorification'.  You could also quote back Mickey Brady's demand for immediate removal'.

And if Mickey Brady is looking for some 'shameful acts of glorification' to have them removed, perhaps he could start in his own constituency with the name of the Raymond McCreesh Park and then move on to the Provisional IRA memorial beside the Ti Chulain Centre in Mullaghbawn.

He might also consider moving further afield to the republican memorial which was erected outside the Church of Ireland parish church in Dungiven.


Mickey Brady should be reminded time and time again of those words 'shameful act of glorification' as indeed should other Sinn Fein politicians.

25 comments:

  1. Perhaps you miss the point Nelson. Erecting a flag to the SAS at the site of one of their worst scenes of slaughter is in the opinion of many 'an act of shameful glorification'. Akin, I would assume, to raising an IRA banner at say La Mon House. Can you seríously not see the distinction?

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  2. Sorry Jake, you have missed the point and you'll have to do better than that. The people at La Mon were innocent people who were out for an evening when they were incinerated by the IRA. An innocent man was killed at Loughgall but the others who were killed were IRA terrorists who were 'on active service'. We will never know how many innocent lives were saved by the action of the Army at Loughgall. However there is also the theory that an IRA/Sinn Fein insider was involved in alerting the Army because the IRA/SF insider wanted these particular IRA men removed. Meanwhile, for most people there is something shameful about equating Loughgall and La Mon. Being burned alive as the victims were at La Mon must be one of the gruesome ways to die.

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  4. Again you miss the point. The British Army and the SAS have a record of slaughter stretching over many many years and countless countries. I know that is not a view to which most pro-british people subscribe. Nontheless it is a fact, easily verified. Many wish to honour and commemorate their deeds and are entitled to do so. Gloating by erecting a memorial banner or flags at the scene of slaughter is distasteful and indeed shameful. I think it beneath contempt to be engaged in whataboutery. A bit of perspective is required. Wars and armed conflicts leave their dead on all sides. Protagonists will remember their own dead, hopefully they can all do so with a modicum of dignity and a bit of tolerance on all sides. I wasn't making any comparison between the two both were awful as is all death in conflict. I was merely during the La Mon bombing as a way of illustrating how shameful and distasteful it would be to erect an honour to the assailants at the scene of their attack as someone has seen fit to do at Loughgall

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  5. Every IRA memorial is a shameful glorification of terrorism.

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  6. Not much I can say to that. It deftly avoids the point, close down any possibility of reasoned debate and allows you to remain in a narrow self-righteous trench. Alas it is your view and you are entitled to it.

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  7. Matthew 7:3 and Luke 6:4 spring to mind

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  8. I'm glad to see that you refer to the Bible and would suggest these verses - Proverbs 6:16-17 These six things doth the LORD hate: yea, seven are an abomination unto him ... hands that shed innocent blood.' However God is rich in grace and mercy and so Romans 6:23 'For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.'

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  9. Does that mean that the Garden of Remembrance in Dublin glorifies terrorism then?

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  10. Eamon, let's deal first with local events with which we are more familiar. Would you agree that every IRA killing was murder?

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  11. I agree that the IRA were undoubtedly responsible for a large number of deaths, and that any death, whatever the circumstances, is a tragedy. But your use of the word murder in this context is quite loaded, and that there must be given a greater perspective on events and on their interpretations; I think the word murder (with all of its negative connotations) as a catch all term for any death that the IRA was responsible for, is too much of a generalised moral summation that fails to take account of the complexity of the circumstances.

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  12. So many words to avoid having to say that IRA killings were murder.
    It is the sort of language we have heard so often from Sinn Fein politicians and other apologists for IRA terrorism.

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  13. Take Loughall as an example, the British soldiers who killed those IRA men would not have thought that their actions constituted murder, but that it was an act of war. Similary, had events transpired otherwise, and the British soldiers had been killed, the IRA would have taken the same view. You should try and be more objective in your evaluations; the past is not the simplistic narrative you've devised.

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  14. I realise that Sinn Fein and other republicans want to sanitise the IRS, legitimise their terrorism and demonise the security forces but the fact remains that murder is murder. Unfortunately you are unwilling to acknowledge that when IRA men went out to kill they were setting out to commit murder and that was true every single time.

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  15. So essentially, your viewpoint is that the IRA were always guilty of murder, yet the security services never were.

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    1. Actually I didn't mention the security forces - I merely said that every killing carried out by the IRA was unlawful and therefore murder.

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    2. I inferred it from " demonise the security services," my mistake. Do you think that the security services were ever guilty of murder then?

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    3. What do you mean by the word murder? Since you won't accept that every IRA killing was murder I don't know what you mean by murder.

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    4. Murder for the sake of murder.

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    5. That is to say, killing for the sake of killing, being murder.

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    6. Murder is unlawful killing and every IRA killing was unlawful so every IRA killing was murder. You should check out the definition of murder.

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    7. Do you think then, that the security forces ever acted inside of the parameters of your definition of murder?

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    8. “demonise the security forces”- open your eyes Nelson, collusion is not an illusion.

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  16. It's much less sophisticated than that Eamon it is "Us good them bad - us saved them damned."

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