Tuesday, 22 May 2018

The GAA is an Irish nationalist organisation


Last Sunday there was some controversy at Healy Park in Omagh when several GAA supporters flew Palestinian flags in the ground.  This happened during the senior GAA championship game between Tyrone and Monaghan.

The Palestinian flags were removed and afterwards a GAA spokesman told the Irish News (22 May): 'There is no flag allowed other than the official (GAA) flag, national flag and team colours.'

By 'the 'national flag' he meant the national flag of the Irish Republic, the Tricolour.

Of course no GAA team is going to object to that since the constitution of the GAA contains in it support for a 32 county Irish republic. Another little reminder that the GAA is an Irish nationalist organisation, with a constitution that prevents unionists from joining.

A Protestant nationalist could join but not a unionist, whether that unionist be a Protestant, Roman Catholic or someone of no faith or another faith.  It is not a religious exclusion, it is a political exclusion, and the Tricolour rule is merely an expression or outworking of that Irish nationalist ethos.


7 comments:

  1. Would it be possible for a protestant nationalist to be an orangeman? I'm genuinely curious.

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  2. Here in the United Kingdom the Orange Order stands for Protestant truth and loyalty to the crown.

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  3. There was that fellow Lindsay Crawford.

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  4. How do the GAA get grants with this type of constitution?

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  5. Perhaps Tom it may have something to do with them being tax and rate-payers and being afforded the protection of the provisions of the GFA in regard to identity. Alas the days of the courts having to debar Unionist Councillors for denying those rights are gone because the law makes it so and not because of any unionist change of heart as is all too evident.

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  6. Jake, the relationship between the GAA and Irish nationalism and republicanism is interesting and important. The constitution of the GAA is an Irish nationalist constitution which excludes those who are not Irish nationalists, something that differentiates the GAA from other sports. It is that exclusion which is controversial and contentious. Ironically this morning the Irish News has reported that the GAA has cancelled a sponsorship deal with the Felons Club. I haven't had a chance to read the full article but do you have any views on the decision?

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  7. The same views as I would have on anyone bending to the witch-hunters of this world to quote a friend of yours 'if you feed the crocodile it will keep coming back.'

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